Category Archives: Carrying Capacity

Without fossil fuels, carrying capacity of the planet is about 1.5 billion people, the USA about 100-150 million

Richard Heinberg – collapse in a few years to decades

China or the U.S.: Which Will Be the Last Nation Standing? Feb 3, 2010 by Richard Heinberg Silly me. Here I had thought that world leaders would want to keep their nations from collapsing. They must be working hard to … Continue reading

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Lester Brown on Water shortages, Climate Change, Soil Erosion, Decreasing Crop Yields

Institute of Medicine. The Nexus of Biofuels, Climate Change, and Human Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014. BIOFUELS AND THE WORLD FOOD ECONOMY The session’s first speaker was Lester Brown, founder and president of the Earth … Continue reading

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Energy in the Food System uses 19% of all energy consumed in the USA. Pimentel 2008

Reducing Energy Inputs in the US Food System David Pimentel & Sean Williamson & Courtney E. Alexander & Omar Gonzalez-Pagan & Caitlin Kontak & Steven E. Mulkey. Hum Ecol (2008) 36:459–471 [some excerpts below. Clearly we’ve got to start reducing … Continue reading

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Energy in Food System. March 2010. USDA

Energy Use in the U.S. Food System 2010. P. Canning et al. USDA. Economic Research Report Number 94 Another great review of this article is Beyond Food Miles by Michael Bomford, a research scientist and extension specialist at Kentucky State … Continue reading

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Writing on the wall for prime farmland. Years of irrigation have taken toll on San Joaquin Valley.

Writing on the wall for prime farmland. Years of irrigation have taken toll on San Joaquin Valley. Carolyn Lochhead. March 24, 2014. San Francisco Chronicle. Decades of irrigation have leached salts and toxic minerals from the soil [in the San … Continue reading

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Overshoot and dieoff : humans beyond carrying capacity

Land transformation by humans: A Review. Roger. Hooke, José F. Martín-Duque. 2012. Geological Society of America Prognosis for the Future Looking ahead a few decades, land suitable for agriculture will likely continue to diminish as urban areas expand soil is … Continue reading

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Food yields lower: climate change, water, soil erosion, weed killers aren’t working…….

An excerpt from: Danger ahead: prioritizing risk avoidance in political and economic decision-making by Brian Davey. Aug 25, 2011. Fleeing Vesuvius If runaway climate change or the Energy Winters predicted by peak-oil theorists are not gloomy enough for you — … Continue reading

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William Rees: Culture and behavior: The human nature of unsustainability

Read the full report:»  Download the PDF (1 MB) by William Rees,  Post Carbon Institute    Sep 1, 2011 The Unsustainability Conundrum In 1992 the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) issued the following gloomy assessment of the prospects for civilization: … Continue reading

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‘The Oil We Eat’ Following the Food Chain back to Iraq

‘The Oil We Eat’ Following the Food Chain back to Iraq by Richard Manning,   Harpers  | May 23, 2004 [reduced and paraphrased, if this interests you then do read the full article since I cut a great deal of … Continue reading

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People use 83% Of Earth’s Land Surface, 98% of land that can grow rice, wheat, or corn

Human “Footprint” Seen on 83 Percent of Earth’s Land Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News October 25, 2002 Humans take up 83 percent of the Earth’s land surface to live on, farm, mine or fish, leaving just a few areas … Continue reading

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