Category Archives: 3) Fast Crash

The case for a fast, rather than a slow one. Most societies crashed in 20 years or less. There has never been or will be again a crash like ours, where the world of 7 billion people became utterly dependent on a non-renewable source of energy — fossil fuels.

Himalayan glaciers that supply water to a billion people are melting fast

Preface. The Himalayan glaciers that supply water to a billion people are melting fast, already 30% has been lost since 1975. Adding to the crisis are the 400 dams under construction or planned for Himalayan rivers in India, Pakistan, Nepal, … Continue reading

Posted in Caused by Scarce Resources, Climate Change, Climate Change, Dams, Water, Water, Water | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Global oil discoveries far from breaking even with consumption

Preface.  According to Bloomberg (2016), oil discoveries in 2015 were the lowest since 1947, with just 2.7 billion barrels of conventional oil found globally (though Rystad calculated this differently at 5.6, nearly twice as much). Since the world burns 36.5 … Continue reading

Posted in How Much Left, Peak Oil | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Tesla pickup truck claims defy the laws of physics by John Engle

In 2017 scientists questioned whether the Tesla Semi could meet Musk’s claims (see post “Given the laws of physics, can the Tesla Semi really go 500 miles, and what will the price be?”). I suspect this is why Tesla has … Continue reading

Posted in Electric Trucks, Electric trucks impossible, Electrification | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

Bodhi Paul Chefurka: Carrying capacity, overshoot and sustainability

Preface. This is a post written by Bodhi Paul Chefurka in 2013 at his blog paulchefurka.ca here. I don’t understand his ultimate sustainable carrying capacity based on hunter gatherers. Why will agriculture go away? But the rest of the article … Continue reading

Posted in Overshoot, Paul Chefurka, Population | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Peak Stainless Steel

This study shows that there is a significant risk that stainless steel production will reach its maximum capacity around 2055 because of declining nickel production, though recycling, and use of other alloys on a very small scale can compensate somewhat. … Continue reading

Posted in Important Minerals, Infrastructure | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Oil Choke Points vulnerable to war, chaos, terrorism, piracy

Preface. The U.S., thanks to fracking, which is likely to peak by 2025, produces half of the 20 million barrels of oil it uses per day. The other half of our oil is imported, with 45% of imports (4.5 million … Continue reading

Posted in Chokepoints, Infrastructure Attacks, Oil & Gas, Oil Shocks, Threats to oil supply | Tagged , , , | 6 Comments

Hydrogen, the Homeopathic Energy Crisis Remedy

Preface.  Hydrogen is the dumbest, most ridiculous possible energy resource. Far more energy is required to make and store it than you get out of it, since it has absolutely no energy at all.  In a hydrogen fuel cell truck, … Continue reading

Posted in Alternative Energy, Electric trucks impossible, Energy, Hydrogen | Tagged , , , | 5 Comments

Peak Helium

Preface. Turns out helium is needed for a lot more than party balloons, and like all resources, it is in decline. I learned that Stuff Runs Out early in life when we visited dozens of abandoned gold and silver mining … Continue reading

Posted in Important Minerals | Tagged , | 4 Comments

How much oil left in America? Not much

If you think no worries because we can get arctic oil, think again. We can’t because icebergs knock the drilling platforms down, and massive amounts of new infrastructure — roads, rail lines, platforms, buildings — are needed to set up … Continue reading

Posted in How Much Left, Peak Oil | Tagged , | 1 Comment

The carbon trap by Paul Chefurka

Preface. We are caught in the carbon trap — we utterly depend on fossils that don’t have an electric replacement. Someday people will figure this out the hard way, but Chefurka compassionately points out that there is no one to … Continue reading

Posted in Consumption, Human Nature, Interdependencies, Paul Chefurka | Tagged , , | 16 Comments